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1 : To polish.

2 : A caravan of travelers; a military supply train or government caravan; a string of pack horses.

3 : of Defile

4 : To march off in a line, file by file; to file off.

5 : Same as Defilade.

6 : Any narrow passage or gorge in which troops can march only in a file, or with a narrow front; a long, narrow pass between hills, rocks, etc.

7 : The act of defilading a fortress, or of raising the exterior works in order to protect the interior. See Defilade.

8 : To make foul or impure; to make filthy; to dirty; to befoul; to pollute.

9 : To soil or sully; to tarnish, as reputation; to taint.

10 : To injure in purity of character; to corrupt.

11 : To corrupt the chastity of; to debauch; to violate.

12 : To make ceremonially unclean; to pollute.

13 : The protection of the interior walls of a fortification from an enfilading fire, as by covering them, or by a high parapet on the exposed side.

14 : The act of defiling, or state of being defiled, whether physically or morally; pollution; foulness; dirtiness; uncleanness.

15 : One who defiles; one who corrupts or violates; that which pollutes.

16 : Having some object, as the head of a man or beast, impaled upon it; as, a sword which is said to be "enfiled of" the thing which it pierces.

17 : An orderly succession; a line; a row

18 : A row of soldiers ranged one behind another; -- in contradistinction to rank, which designates a row of soldiers standing abreast; a number consisting the depth of a body of troops, which, in the ordinary modern formation, consists of two men, the battalion standing two deep, or in two ranks.

19 : An orderly collection of papers, arranged in sequence or classified for preservation and reference; as, files of letters or of newspapers; this mail brings English files to the 15th instant.

20 : The line, wire, or other contrivance, by which papers are put and kept in order.

21 : A roll or list.

22 : Course of thought; thread of narration.

23 : of File

24 : To set in order; to arrange, or lay away, esp. as papers in a methodical manner for preservation and reverence; to place on file; to insert in its proper place in an arranged body of papers.

25 : To bring before a court or legislative body by presenting proper papers in a regular way; as, to file a petition or bill.

26 : To put upon the files or among the records of a court; to note on (a paper) the fact date of its reception in court.

27 : To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another; -- generally with off.

28 : A steel instrument, having cutting ridges or teeth, made by indentation with a chisel, used for abrading or smoothing other substances, as metals, wood, etc.

29 : Anything employed to smooth, polish, or rasp, literally or figuratively.

30 : A shrewd or artful person.

31 : To rub, smooth, or cut away, with a file; to sharpen with a file; as, to file a saw or a tooth.

32 : To smooth or polish as with a file.

33 : To make foul; to defile.

34 : Any plectognath fish of the genera Monacanthus, Alutera, balistes, and allied genera; -- so called on account of the roughly granulated skin, which is sometimes used in place of sandpaper.

35 : See Feullemort.

36 : One who works with a file.

37 : To arrange in a file or rank; to place in order.

38 : An outline, or contour; as, the profile of an apple.

39 : A human head represented sidewise, or in a side view; the side face or half face.

40 : A section of any member, made at right angles with its main lines, showing the exact shape of moldings and the like.

41 : A drawing exhibiting a vertical section of the ground along a surveyed line, or graded work, as of a railway, showing elevations, depressions, grades, etc.

42 : of Profile

43 : to draw the outline of; to draw in profile, as an architectural member.

44 : To shape the outline of an object by passing a cutter around it.

45 : A sort of ancient trimming of tinsel and thread for women's gowns; -- called also bobbinwork.

46 : The six-shafted bird of paradise. See Paradise bird, under Paradise.

47 : Undefiled.

48 : To remove from a file or record.

49 : Not defiled; pure.

(49) words is found which contain file in our database

For file word found data is following....

1 : Affile

v. t.

To polish.

2 : Cafileh

n.

A caravan of travelers; a military supply train or government caravan; a string of pack horses.

3 : Defiled

imp. & p. p.

of Defile

4 : Defile

v. i.

To march off in a line, file by file; to file off.

5 : Defile

v. t.

Same as Defilade.

6 : Defile

n.

Any narrow passage or gorge in which troops can march only in a file, or with a narrow front; a long, narrow pass between hills, rocks, etc.

7 : Defile

n.

The act of defilading a fortress, or of raising the exterior works in order to protect the interior. See Defilade.

8 : Defile

v. t.

To make foul or impure; to make filthy; to dirty; to befoul; to pollute.

9 : Defile

v. t.

To soil or sully; to tarnish, as reputation; to taint.

10 : Defile

v. t.

To injure in purity of character; to corrupt.

11 : Defile

v. t.

To corrupt the chastity of; to debauch; to violate.

12 : Defile

v. t.

To make ceremonially unclean; to pollute.

13 : Defilement

n.

The protection of the interior walls of a fortification from an enfilading fire, as by covering them, or by a high parapet on the exposed side.

14 : Defilement

n.

The act of defiling, or state of being defiled, whether physically or morally; pollution; foulness; dirtiness; uncleanness.

15 : Defiler

n.

One who defiles; one who corrupts or violates; that which pollutes.

16 : Enfiled

p. a.

Having some object, as the head of a man or beast, impaled upon it; as, a sword which is said to be "enfiled of" the thing which it pierces.

17 : File

n.

An orderly succession; a line; a row

18 : File

n.

A row of soldiers ranged one behind another; -- in contradistinction to rank, which designates a row of soldiers standing abreast; a number consisting the depth of a body of troops, which, in the ordinary modern formation, consists of two men, the battalion standing two deep, or in two ranks.

19 : File

n.

An orderly collection of papers, arranged in sequence or classified for preservation and reference; as, files of letters or of newspapers; this mail brings English files to the 15th instant.

20 : File

n.

The line, wire, or other contrivance, by which papers are put and kept in order.

21 : File

n.

A roll or list.

22 : File

n.

Course of thought; thread of narration.

23 : Filed

imp. & p. p.

of File

24 : File

v. t.

To set in order; to arrange, or lay away, esp. as papers in a methodical manner for preservation and reverence; to place on file; to insert in its proper place in an arranged body of papers.

25 : File

v. t.

To bring before a court or legislative body by presenting proper papers in a regular way; as, to file a petition or bill.

26 : File

v. t.

To put upon the files or among the records of a court; to note on (a paper) the fact date of its reception in court.

27 : File

v. i.

To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another; -- generally with off.

28 : File

n.

A steel instrument, having cutting ridges or teeth, made by indentation with a chisel, used for abrading or smoothing other substances, as metals, wood, etc.

29 : File

n.

Anything employed to smooth, polish, or rasp, literally or figuratively.

30 : File

n.

A shrewd or artful person.

31 : File

v. t.

To rub, smooth, or cut away, with a file; to sharpen with a file; as, to file a saw or a tooth.

32 : File

v. t.

To smooth or polish as with a file.

33 : File

v. t.

To make foul; to defile.

34 : Filefish

n.

Any plectognath fish of the genera Monacanthus, Alutera, balistes, and allied genera; -- so called on account of the roughly granulated skin, which is sometimes used in place of sandpaper.

35 : Filemot

n.

See Feullemort.

36 : Filer

n.

One who works with a file.

37 : Infile

v. t.

To arrange in a file or rank; to place in order.

38 : Profile

n.

An outline, or contour; as, the profile of an apple.

39 : Profile

n.

A human head represented sidewise, or in a side view; the side face or half face.

40 : Profile

n.

A section of any member, made at right angles with its main lines, showing the exact shape of moldings and the like.

41 : Profile

n.

A drawing exhibiting a vertical section of the ground along a surveyed line, or graded work, as of a railway, showing elevations, depressions, grades, etc.

42 : Profiled

imp. & p. p.

of Profile

43 : Profile

n.

to draw the outline of; to draw in profile, as an architectural member.

44 : Profile

n.

To shape the outline of an object by passing a cutter around it.

45 : Purfile

n.

A sort of ancient trimming of tinsel and thread for women's gowns; -- called also bobbinwork.

46 : Sifilet

n.

The six-shafted bird of paradise. See Paradise bird, under Paradise.

47 : Unafiled

a.

Undefiled.

48 : Unfile

v. t.

To remove from a file or record.

49 : Unfiled

a.

Not defiled; pure.

This word file uses (4) total characters with white space

This word file uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word file uses 4 unique characters: E F I L

Number of all permutations npr for file word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for file word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for file

2 same character containing word for file

3 same character containing word For file

4 same character containing word For file

All permutations word for file

All combinations word for file

All similar letter combinations related to file

From Wikipedia

File or filing may refer to:

From Wiktionary

See also: File, filé, and fíle

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Synonyms
        • 1.2.1.2 Hyponyms
        • 1.2.1.3 Derived terms
        • 1.2.1.4 Related terms
        • 1.2.1.5 Translations
      • 1.2.2 Verb
        • 1.2.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.2.2.2 Translations
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Noun
        • 1.3.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.3.1.2 Translations
      • 1.3.2 Verb
        • 1.3.2.1 Derived terms
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Noun
        • 1.4.1.1 Hyponyms
        • 1.4.1.2 Derived terms
        • 1.4.1.3 Translations
      • 1.4.2 Verb
        • 1.4.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.4.2.2 Translations
    • 1.5 Etymology 4
      • 1.5.1 Verb
    • 1.6 Anagrams
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology 1
      • 2.1.1 Pronunciation
      • 2.1.2 Noun
        • 2.1.2.1 Synonyms
    • 2.2 Etymology 2
      • 2.2.1 Pronunciation
      • 2.2.2 Noun
    • 2.3 Anagrams
  • 3 Esperanto
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Adverb
  • 4 French
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Pronunciation
    • 4.3 Noun
      • 4.3.1 Synonyms
      • 4.3.2 Derived terms
    • 4.4 Verb
    • 4.5 Further reading
    • 4.6 Anagrams
  • 5 Irish
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Noun
      • 5.2.1 Declension
      • 5.2.2 Derived terms
    • 5.3 Mutation
  • 6 Italian
    • 6.1 Noun
    • 6.2 Noun
    • 6.3 Anagrams
  • 7 Kurdish
    • 7.1 Noun
  • 8 Old Irish
    • 8.1 Verb
  • 9 Slovene
    • 9.1 Pronunciation
    • 9.2 Noun
      • 9.2.1 Declension
  • 10 Spanish
    • 10.1 Verb

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
file
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /faɪl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Etymology 1[edit]

French fil (thread), Latin filum (thread).

Noun[edit]

file (plural files)

  1. A collection of papers collated and archived together.
    • Shakespeare
      It is upon a file with the duke's other letters.
  2. A roll or list.
    • Shakespeare
      a file of all the gentry
  3. Course of thought; thread of narration.
    • Sir H. Wotton
      Let me resume the file of my narration.
  4. (computing) An aggregation of data on a storage device, identified by a name.
    I'm going to delete these unwanted files to free up some disk space.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (collection): document, a paper
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (transitive) To commit official papers to some office
  2. (transitive) To place in an archive in a logical place and order
  3. (transitive) To store a file (aggregation of data) on a storage medium such as a disc or another computer.
  4. (intransitive, with for, chiefly law) To make a formal request for the benefit of an official status.
    She filed for divorce the next day.
    The company filed for bankruptcy when the office opened on Monday.
    They filed for a refund under their warranty.
    • 2012 May 27, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      The episode’s unwillingness to fully commit to the pathos of the Bart-and-Laura subplot is all the more frustrating considering its laugh quota is more than filled by a rollicking B-story that finds Homer, he of the iron stomach and insatiable appetite, filing a lawsuit against The Frying Dutchman when he’s hauled out of the eatery against his will after consuming all of the restaurant’s shrimp (plus two plastic lobsters).
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To set in order; to arrange, or lay away.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      I would have my several courses and my dishes well filed.
Derived terms[edit]
  • filings
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

French file, from filer, “to spin out”, “arrange one behind another”, Latin fīlāre, from filum, “thread”.

Noun[edit]

file (plural files)

  1. A column of people one behind another, whether "single file" or in a large group with many files side by side.
    The troops marched in Indian file.
  2. (military) A small detachment of soldiers.
  3. (chess) one of the eight vertical lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those identified by a letter). The analog horizontal lines are the ranks.
Derived terms[edit]
  • Indian file
  • rank and file
  • single file
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (intransitive) To move in a file.
    The applicants kept filing into the room until it was full.
Derived terms[edit]
  • file in
  • file out

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English file, fyle, from Old English fēl, fēol (file), from earlier fīil, from Proto-Germanic *finhlō, *finhilō (file, rasp), from Proto-Indo-European *peyḱ- (to adorn, form). Cognate with West Frisian file (file), Dutch vijl (file), German Feile (file).

Noun[edit]

A file (tool).

file (plural files)

  1. A hand tool consisting of a handle to which a block of coarse metal is attached, and used for removing sharp edges or for cutting, especially through metal.
  2. (slang, archaic) A cunning or resourceful person.
    • Thackeray
      Will is an old file, in spite of his smooth face.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)
Hyponyms[edit]
  • rasp
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (transitive) To smooth, grind, or cut with a file.
    I'd better file the bottoms of the table legs. Otherwise they will scratch the flooring.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapterII:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English filen (to defile), from Old English fȳlan (to defile, make foul), from Proto-Germanic *fūlijaną (to make foul). More at defile.

Verb[edit]

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (archaic) to defile
  2. to corrupt

Anagrams[edit]

  • Life, flie, lief, life

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French file (line, row), from Late Latin filare, from Latin filum (thread). Related to fileren (to fillet) and file (computer file).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fi‧le

Noun[edit]

file f (plural files, diminutive filetje n)

  1. traffic jam
  2. queue
Synonyms[edit]
  • opstopping

Etymology 2[edit]

From English file (computer file), from Old French fil (thread), from Latin filum (thread). Related to fileren (to fillet) and file (queue, traffic jam).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: file

Noun[edit]

file m (plural files, diminutive filetje n)

  1. (computing) an aggregation of data on a storage device, identified by a name; a file

Anagrams[edit]

  • lief

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fil- + -e

Adverb[edit]

file

  1. filially (in a filial manner or way)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From fil or the verb filer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fil/
  • (file)
  • Homophones: fil, filent, files, fils, Phil, -phile

Noun[edit]

file f (plural files)

  1. A line of objects placed one after the other.
  2. (Belgium) traffic jam

Synonyms[edit]

  • (jam): bouchon, embouteillage

Derived terms[edit]

  • file d'attente
  • chef de file

Verb[edit]

file

  1. first-person singular present indicative of filer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of filer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of filer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of filer
  5. second-person singular imperative of filer

Further reading[edit]

  • “file” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams[edit]

  • fiel

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish fili, from Primitive Irish ᚃᚓᚂᚔᚈᚐᚄ (velitas), from Proto-Celtic *weless.

Noun[edit]

file m (genitive singular file, nominative plural filí)

  1. poet

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • filíocht

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
RadicalLenitionEclipsis
filefhilebhfile
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

file m (invariable)

  1. (computing) file

Noun[edit]

file f

  1. plural of fila

Anagrams[edit]

  • elfi

Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

file ?

  1. Christian

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

file

  1. Alternative form of fil

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fiˈléː/
  • Tonal orthography: filẹ̑
  • Hyphenation: fi‧lé

Noun[edit]

filé m inan (genitive filêja, nominative plural filêji)

  1. fillet

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

file

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of filar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of filar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of filar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of filar.